Air Canada Lands In Doghouse For Accidental E-mail Reply

Brennan Linsley/AP TORONTO (AP) — Former NHL star Joe Sakic was inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame on Wednesday night. Sakic helped the Colorado Avalanche win two Stanley Cup titles and is now the team’s executive vice president of hockey operations. He also won titles at the Winter Olympics, world hockey championship, World Cup of Hockey and world juniors. ”To play for your country, I got a chance to play with Wayne Gretzky and Mario Lemieux, and I wouldn’t have had that happen on my regular team,” Sakic said. ”Any time you put the Canadian jersey on, you just felt something more and something special. The game just seemed to mean a little bit more. We never took that for granted.” He was inducted along with Olympic champion curler Russ Howard, cyclist Alison Sydor, late five-time Paralympian Andre Viger and the 1992 Olympic champion women’s coxless four rowing team of Kirsten Barnes, Brenda Taylor, Jessica Monroe-Gonin, Kay Worthington and Jennifer Walinga. Former Canadian Amateur Hockey Association President Murray Costello and sport development architect Dr. Jean-Guy Ouellet entered as builders. Copyright 2013 Associated Press . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. More NHL

He was echoed by EU Trade spokesman John Clancy, who said: “Discussions are indeed continuing at the highest level between the EU and Canada towards a comprehensive free trade deal (CETA) — with the hope to conclude the negotiations in the coming days.” Official sources told AFP the deal would give the European Union increased access for cheese sales, clearing one of the last hurdles to a free trade pact. The agreement-in-principle must now be sent back to Canada’s provinces for final approval, they said. On several previous occasions, officials on both sides of the Atlantic have touted a deal was imminent but deadlines passed and no announcement was forthcoming. Negotiations started in 2009 with the expectation they would be concluded by late 2012, but they became deadlocked over a few holdout issues, mainly in agriculture. Canada asked for increased European access for its beef while the EU sought to lower tariffs of up to 300 per cent shielding Canada’s supply-managed dairy industry from imports of European cheeses. On Wednesday, the Canadian dairy farmers’ association said it would not support a deal that would allow the EU to sell more cheese in this country, arguing that its current quota was already generous. “This (potential) deal would displace our local products with subsidized cheeses from EU and risk our small businesses being shut down or put out of business. This is unacceptable,” the Dairy Farmers of Canada said in a statement. Rudy Husny, spokesman for Canadian Trade Minister Ed Fast, however, reminded that Harper committed to protecting Canada’s supply-managed agricultural sectors. “Our government has been clear. All of the three key pillars of our domestic system of supply management must remain intact: production controls, import controls, and price controls,” he said. The actual amount of the proposed EU cheese quota increase is small, he said.

Canada PM says close to reaching free trade deal with EU

EDT October 14, 2013 Air Canada planes at Montreal’s Pierre Trudeau International Airport on March 23, 2012. (Photo: Ryan Remiorz, AP) Air Canada SHARE 167 CONNECT 62 TWEET 1 COMMENTEMAILMORE MONTREAL Air Canada is in the doghouse over a spokesman’s remarks following the disappearance of a dog who escaped airline staff at a California airport. The company says handlers at San Francisco International Airport took the dog out of his crate on Monday after his flight was delayed and the pet either slipped out of his collar or broke it. Air Canada says the dog, an Italian greyhound named Larry, bolted and was last spotted about 5 miles from the airport. TODAY IN THE SKY: Your bookmark for the day’s most interesting airline stories The local CBS TV station took interest in Larry’s disappearance and says it asked the airline about its procedures after obtaining a statement about the incident. Instead, the station says it accidentally received an email from spokesman Peter Fitzpatrick urging his colleagues to ignore the inquiry and what sounded like a jab at the U.S. government shutdown. “I think I would just ignore, it is local news doing a story on a lost dog. Their entire government is shut down and about to default and this is how the US media spends its time,” the station said the e-mail read. Word quickly spread online, with many voicing their outrage over the company’s response. “If you ever fly with your pet, you might not want to choose Air Canada,” one wrote on Twitter. The airline addressed the controversy in a statement Friday. “Air Canada acknowledges inappropriate comments were made in response to a reporter’s follow-up questions for additional details regarding Larry,” it said.