London Mayor Opposes U.k. Press Regulation Plans

“Cronuts are called “Yum Yums” in this country and you can buy them in [the supermarket Waitrose . We’ve had them for decades,” wrote Richard Turner, the owner of London’s Hawksmoor steakhouse , in an email to his business partner. Adalat Hussain, co-owner of the Wild and Wood cafe in Central London says British cronut-eaters are attempting to master the treat with a knife and fork. “I think using your hands is the best way,” he says. It just went viral because it’s new. It’s fun; it’s unusual; it’s good. Dominique Ansel Back across the pond, a young woman in the queue outside the Dominique Ansel Bakery declared the cronut a typically American invention. “A croissant is a great pastry in the morning; a doughnut is a great pastry in the morning. Really to combine the two is representative of the American way. It’s really efficient and delicious and fattening and great.” Dominique Ansel has copyrighted the term “cronut,” prompting bakeries to come up with alternative names like “doissant”, “croissant-doughnut” and “doughssant”. The much-loved British bakery chain Gregg’s launched the Greggsnut in September. “There’s nothing unique about it,” says Hussain.

8. Celebrity Photos: October 2013 Lea Michele met Jane Lynch and Matthew Morrison of “Glee” for lunch at the Four Seasons in Los Angeles, Calif., on Oct. 8. Celebrity Photos: October 2013 Jessica Alba was seen outside Breakfast Television and the CBC building, promoting her ‘The Honest Company’ baby products in Toronto on Oct. 8. Celebrity Photos: October 2013 Jude Law signed autographs for fans outside the BBC Radio One studios on Oct. 8 in London. Celebrity Photos: October 2013 Abbie Cornish attended the MIPCOM party during MIPCOM 2013 in Cannes, France on Oct. 7. Celebrity Photos: October 2013 Stacy Keibler hit the road on the Can-Am Spyder, celebrating with an early birthday ride in the open air in Los Angeles, Calif., on Oct. 7. Celebrity Photos: October 2013 Khloe Kardashian and Rapper The Game arrived at Tru Night Club in Los Angeles, Calif., on Oct.

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Press Regulation Plans 8:51 AM PDT 10/14/2013 by Georg Szalai 0 Getty Images London mayor Boris Johnson “You either have a free press or you dont,” says Boris Johnson and shares how he and his family once imitated Eddie Murphy in “Beverly Hills Cop” to play a trick on a reporter. LONDON London mayor Boris Johnson in a newspaper editorial on Monday spoke out against planned U.K. press regulation following the Leveson Inquiry report late last year. our editor recommends “We are on the verge of eroding the freedom of the press,” Johnson wrote in the Daily Telegraph . “It’s a vigorous, voracious press that keeps our country honest. Regulating the media would undermine its ferocious ability to highlight wrongdoing.” He called a planned royal charter outlining the new regulation a “monstrous folly.” Johnson also suggested that a political expenses scandal led British politicians to call for the Leveson Inquiry, not the phone hacking scandal surrounding Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. “It was the hacking cases that gave them their pretext,” he wrote. Johnson also argued Monday that Britain’s current laws sufficiently protect people from media abuse. “We already have abundant law against obscenity or breach of official secrets. We have laws against libel and defamation, against bugging, hacking, theft, bribery of public officials,” he wrote. “We have a growing tort of breach of privacy. We have no need of some new body backed by statute…and it is wrong in principle.” Concluded the London mayor: “You either have a free press or you dont. You cant sell the pass, and admit the principle of regulation because it is in the nature of regulation that it swells and grows. You cant be a little bit pregnant.” Johnson also had a suggestion for those “bothered by those nasty people from the media.” If they “wont go away, and they continue to sit outside your house asking questions to which you have already told them the answer, may I recommend that you do as my children and I once did years ago,” he wrote.

London police question four terror suspects after raids

A Metropolitan Police spokesman said so-called Hatton rounds — special shotgun ammunition used to breach doors and tyres — were “specifically used to disable a car” in the arrests in east London. “They were used to shoot at tyres. No one was injured,” the spokesman told AFP. The arrest took place in a street about 200 metres from the Tower of London, one of London’s busiest tourist attractions. Armed officers were involved in all of the arrests. All four men were being held at a police station in south London on suspicion of the commission, preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism. Under British counter-terror laws the suspects can be held for 48 hours and police can then apply for warrants to hold them for up to 14 days from the time of arrest. Police said the raids were the result of a “pre-planned intelligence operation” and added that “public safety remains our overriding concern”. The BBC quoted government officials as saying that a decision to act was taken on Sunday to dismantle the “potentially very serious” plot, although it was not on the scale of previous large-scale bomb plots. A witness to the arrest in Notting Hill, in an upmarket street lined with boutiques and restaurants, said the arrested man “didn’t look like a terrorist”. Ramin Massodi, a worker at a Persian restaurant, said specialist officers in several cars pushed the suspect up against the glass of the restaurant.