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Seizures Turned Into Music With Help Of ‘Brain Stethoscope’ (AUDIO)

Libraries are “meeting patrons where they want to access content,” said Kirk Blankenship, Electronic Resources Librarian for Seattle Public Libraries, which is using the service called Hoopla. The service, from Ohio-based Midwest Tape, LLC, is also being used in Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, Topeka, Kan., and several others towns and cities nationwide. Hoopla launched in full in May with 20 library systems. As of early September, there are about 220,000 people using the app, said Michael Manon, Hoopla’s brand manager. The goal is to reach 100 library systems by year’s end. Libraries have always been a source of audiovisual entertainment. A 2012 Pew Research Center survey found that among patrons 16 years old and older, 40 percent visited libraries to borrow movies. Another 16 percent borrowed music. In the Seattle area, DVDs and CDs of popular titles can have queues of hundreds of people waiting to check them out. E-books have been offered for years now. “Public libraries do not have the budgets to compete with Amazon, Comcast, and Netflix and will not be able to pay a premium for online content,” Blankenship said, adding that DVDs will continue to be the best way to offer popular movies. Updating and maintaining that physical collection takes time and money. It also means libraries have to pay for the media upfront, while Hoopla allows them to pay per time a title is borrowed.

Chris Chafe used electrodes to record the brain waves of an individual in the throes of a seizure. Then they converted the spikes of rapidly firing brain cells into tones that mimic the human voice. “My initial interest was an artistic one at heart, but, surprisingly, we could instantly differentiate seizure activity from non-seizure states with just our ears,” Chafe, a professor of music research at the university, said in a written statement. “It was like turning a radio dial from a static-filled station to a clear one.” The researchers say their “brain stethoscope” could lead to the development of a biofeedback device that would make it possible for caregivers to detect seizures in people with epilepsy simply by listening to their brain wave activity. “Someone – perhaps a mother caring for a child — who hasn’t received training in interpreting visual EEGs [electroencephalograms] can hear the seizure rhythms and easily appreciate that there is a pathological brain phenomenon taking place,” Parvizi, associate professor of neurology at the university, said in the statement. Also on HuffPost: Loading Slideshow The Brain As Art Wellcome Trust employee Zoe Middleton poses for the media by a work entitled ‘My Soul’ by artist Katherine Dawson, that is a laser etched in lead crystal glass of the artist’s own MRI scan, at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March, 27, 2012. The free exhibition is open to the public from March 29- June 17. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) French Phrenological Model A French Phrenological model, from the mid 19th century, of a head with brain exposed is seen on display at an exhibition call ‘Brains – The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. The free exhibition is open to the public from March 29- June 17. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Pathologies In Brain Specimens A selection of brain specimens preserved in acrylic illustrating different pathologies on loan from the Mutter Museum -The College of Physicians of Philadelphia are seen on display at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Surgical Skull Holes A Bronze Age skull from Jericho in the West Bank that shows four holes made by the ancient surgical process of trephination carried out to treat a range of medical conditions, some of which were believed to have been caused by evil spirits, is on display at the exhibition ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Diagrams of the Skull A member of the media takes an image of diagrams of the human skull at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. The free exhibition is open to the public from March 29- June 17. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) ‘Brains – Mind as Matter’ A Wellcome Trust employee stands in front of a video that journeys through slices of the brain in a kaleidoscope of colour at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Bits of Brilliance: Einstein’s Brain Two slices of Albert Einstein’s brain are seen at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March, 27, 2012.