Wanna Introduce A Film On Turner Classic Movies?

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Most likely, North American whalers went to Chile, found varieties of popcorn, picked them up and thought that they were cute, and brought them back to New England in the early 19th century, Smith explains. After popcorn made its way to the eastern part of North America, it spread rapidly. Eaters found the act of popping corn wildly entertaining , and by 1848, popcorn, the snack food, was prevalent enough to be included in theDictionary of Americanisms.Popcorn had literally exploded onto the scene and was available everywhereespecially at entertainment sites like circuses and fairs. In fact, there was really only one entertainment site where the snack was absent: the theaters. One reason for popcorns increasing popularity was its mobility: in 1885, the first steam-powered popcorn maker hit the streets, invented by Charles Cretor . The mobile nature of the machine made it the perfect production machine for serving patrons attending outdoor sporting events, or circuses and fairs. Not only was popcorn mobile, but it could be mass-produced without a kitchen, an advantage that another crunchy snackthe potato chiplacked (the earliest potato chips were made in small batches in kitchens, not ideal for mass snack appeal). Another reason for its dominance over other snacks was its appealing aroma when popped, something that street vendors used to their advantage when selling popcorn. Still, movie theaters wouldnt allow the popular street snack into their auditoriums. Movie theaters wanted nothing to do with popcorn, Smith says, because they were trying to duplicate whatwas done in real theaters. They had beautiful carpets and rugs and didnt want popcorn being ground into it. Movie theaters were trying to appeal to a highbrow clientele, and didnt want to deal with the distracting trash of concessionsor the distracting noise that snacking during a film would create. When films added sound in 1927, the movie theater industry opened itself up to a much wider clientele, since literacy was no longer required to attend films (the titles used early silent films restricted their audience). By 1930, attendance to movie theaters had reached 90 million per week.

9 Movies You Should Be Ashamed To Be Afraid Of

9 Movies You Should Be Ashamed To Be Afraid Of

Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark (1973) S There are two different parts of Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark. There’s the part that has insane goblin voices that laugh in the darkness, slowly manipulate the heroine until her own friends leave her helpless, and then drag her off to an undetermined fate. And then there’s the third act with the little guys who look like someone put an apple-face doll in a suit. Once you see the ending, you’ll feel like a dork (and not in a good way) for covering your eyes during the first half. 6. Citadel (2012) S Citadel is a well-crafted film that keeps you guessing. A cheerful young man witnesses an attack on his pregnant wife by hoodies. He develops crippling agoraphobia. He’s also reduced to poverty. Between these two factors, the world becomes a hellscape, with zombielike civil servants who regard his terror with no compassion, black-outs and bus stoppages that leave him vulnerable, and random frightening events that could be attacks or could be bad luck with no safety net. The man’s fear infects the watcher.

13 Cheesy Horror Movies to Scare You With Laughter

Killer Klowns from Outer Space Clowns are scary enough on their own. In this 1988 horror flick, we’re talking about aliens that look like clowns — that also have killer shadow-puppet magic skills. Who came up with this stuff, anyway? Video: YouTube, pocketsizedbeauty 2. Dead Alive Forget about the rib-ripping scene, in which we learn our insides look like a mudslide when pouring out of our body. The scariest part is at 1:25, when we discover that the living dead will dig for your gold. ‘Snot funny. Video: YouTube, movieclips 3. Chopping Mall How can you tell things are going to get weird in this 1986 film? The screaming, pants-less woman is not even the most questionable part of the clip. Who was that robo-mall cop thanking, anyway? Video: YouTube, bmoviereviews . 4. Troll 2 This 1990 horror-comedy B-movie is so hilariously bad, it has developed a cult following.

on USATODAY.com: Incorrect please try again A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Sent! A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Join the Nation’s Conversation To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Wanna introduce a film on Turner Classic Movies? Whitney Matheson, USA TODAY 1:16 p.m. EDT October 2, 2013 A new contest will let a Turner Classic Movies fan co-host a film with Robert Osborne. (Photo: TCM) SHARE 29 CONNECT 13 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE If I watch a classic film on Turner Classic Movies, I make sure to catch Robert Osborne’s insightful introductions and postscripts. More often than not, he tells me something I didn’t know, and that even goes for movies I’ve seen dozens of times (like, say, The Graduate). This month, TCM is holding a contest that will let one lucky fan co-host a movie with Osborne. Over at the site for its ” Ultimate Fan Contest ,” you can submit a 90-second video of yourself introducing a classic film. Along with being featured on the air, the grand-prize winner will win a trip to the 2014 TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood, where he/she also will introduce a film. The contest just kicked off, so few submissions have been posted on the site. However, this clever sample sets the standard for what they’re looking for. TCM is accepting entries through Oct.